Austin's Blog

 

How to write a eulogy

July 19th, 2016    Author:

When a loved one dies, you might be asked to give a eulogy at their funeral. This is a poignant way to say goodbye to the deceased and to commemorate their life. While it’s an honour to give a eulogy, it can feel like a daunting task so we’ve put together some tips that we hope will help you.

Before writing the eulogy it’s always worth asking the deceased’s family if they would prefer a particular style. Some eulogies are quite formal – giving a chronological overview of the deceased’s personal and professional life – while others are more personalised using stories and anecdotes. Often, a eulogy will combine a bit of both styles.

You don’t have to come up with all the stories and anecdotes yourself. Ask the deceased’s friends and family to share their favourite memories so you can include them. Don’t feel like you’re burdening them by asking for their help – talking about their loved one can help with the grieving process and they’ll appreciate hearing their recollections in your eulogy.

If you’re having difficulty recalling your own memories, take some time to visit the deceased’s house if you can. Seeing a particular ornament or smelling the flowers in their garden may trigger a memory. You could also look through photo albums or old letters for inspiration.

A eulogy could also include a passage from the Bible or a favourite quote of theirs or a memorial poem you feel would be appropriate.

Once you’ve written a rough draft of the eulogy with everything you’d like to include you can edit it. And of course it’s a good idea to practise reading the eulogy a few times before the funeral.

On the day, you’re bound to feel nervous – you’ll be speaking in front of a group of people and it will be a very emotional time for everyone. Don’t worry about letting those emotions show or stumbling over the occasional word. Just remember that you’re all there together, united in your love for the person to whom you’re saying goodbye.

* Austin’s are here to help you with all aspects of planning a funeral. Please get in touch with us on 01438 316623.

Eco Friendly Funerals

June 22nd, 2016    Author:

At Austin’s we’re always interested to hear about eco-friendly alternatives to funerals so we were fascinated to learn about a novel new way of sending off loved ones.

One company in America take the deceased’s ashes and make special ‘reef balls’, which are then placed on the sea floor to mimic natural coral reef. It’s very unusual, to say the least, but it actually sounds like a lovely tribute. Loved ones are invited along to help create the balls and can personalise them by adding hand prints, written messages and small personal mementos in the environmentally-safe concrete that encases the ashes. The reef balls are then left on the seabed as a permanent environmental living legacy.

We may not be able to offer such a unique service at Austin’s, but we do like to ensure our customers have eco-friendly options. For those who’d like a biodegradable coffin for their loved one we have a choice of The Datchworth, which is handmade from English willow, or The Bramfield, made with sturdy recycled paper.

Meanwhile, at Harwood Park Crematorium there’s a real feeling of loved ones being returned to nature. Within the park, the sapling of a chestnut or woodland tree can be planted as a dedicated Living Memorial to the deceased, with their ashes scattered or buried alongside.

Whatever type of funeral you’d like, we’re here to help in any way we can. Please get in touch with us on 01438 815555.

The Bramfield The Datchworth

Is it time to talk about death?

May 17th, 2016    Author:

Talking about death is something most people prefer not to do. According to the coalition Dying Matters, over 70% of people don’t feel comfortable talking about death and less than a third have discussed their end-of-life wishes with loved ones.

It’s something that Dying Matters – which promotes awareness of dying, death and bereavement – would like to see change. Its annual Awareness Week held each May aims to get people talking about a subject that they’d normally shy away from. As well as opening up the discussion about death, Dying Matters also wants to encourage everyone to think about how they could improve their own end-of-life experience when it comes – perhaps by planning their future care, making a will or writing down their funeral wishes.

One place where mortality is openly discussed is the new breed of Death Cafes, which started springing up in the UK a few years ago. The idea behind the cafés was to create an environment where talking about death was natural and comfortable. Over tea and cake, people can chat about all sorts of death-related topics – such as cremation versus burial, what makes the perfect death, how to choose a coffin – without being viewed as morbid or macabre.

Death Cafes are held in all sorts of places, including cemeteries and people’s homes. The nearest Death Cafe is currently in Bedford, or you might like to set up your own. For details, go to http://deathcafe.com/

At Austin’s we understand the importance of talking. We’re here to help guide you through the funeral process and answer any questions you may have. And if someone has just died, our 24-hour service means we are able to support you immediately, at this most difficult time. To discuss your funeral needs, please contact us on 01438 794420.

The Hospice of St Francis Receive Donation

May 10th, 2016    Author:

Austins were delighted to make a donation of £4,445.00 from Harwood Park Crematorium to Vanessa Howden-Smith at The Hospice of St Francis in Berkhamsted. We hope that the contribution will assist them in their valuable work at the hospice and within the local community.

Peter and Claire Handover Cheque for £4445

Peter and Claire Handover Cheque for £4445