Austin's Blog

 

Our Christmas present to a local charity

December 13th, 2017    Author:

It’s always lovely to help local charities so Austin’s was thrilled to hand over a cheque for £5,000 to Crossroads Care Hertfordshire North this month. It’s a fantastic charity that supports unpaid carers and their families through a range of services, including help at home, community cafes and respite care.

The donation was made possible by our membership of the Institute of Cemetery and Crematorium Management (ICCM), which runs an innovate Metals Recycling Scheme.  As part of the scheme, crematoriums can have metals collected from their premises, with profits from the recycling scheme fed back so that they can donate to their nominated charity.

The ICCM started its recycling scheme in 2006, following on from other European countries like Holland, Germany and Switzerland. The idea behind it was first and foremost to help the environment – which is why our Harwood Park Crematorium was so keen to sign up.

The main metal that’s collected is from orthopaedic implants, which people may have had for a joint replacement or bone repair operation. These implants are made from medical-grade metal that comes from non-renewable sources – so a huge amount of energy is wasted in mining new ores to produce more metal. With the metal recycling scheme, the implants are smelted down ready to make new orthopaedic implants.

Since we joined the ICCM’s metal recycling scheme 11 years ago we’ve not only been helping to protect the planet in this way we’ve also raised around £30k for local charities, including Road Victims Trust, Keech Hospice Care and the MS Centre in Letchworth.

Of course we understand that not everyone will want to have their loved one’s implants recycled. Some people may prefer to either have an implant returned to them or for it to be buried. Unfortunately, however, we can’t scatter cremated remains that contain metal.

We’re always sensitive to a family’s needs and when you come to us to arrange a funeral we’ll do whatever feels right for you and your loved one. If you do decide to opt for recycling we’ll ask you to sign a consent form so that everyone is clear about your wishes.

 

* If you’d like to arrange a cremation at Harwood Park Crematorium, please contact us on 01438 815555.

 

Claire Austin hands a £5,000 cheque to Andrew Taylor, operations manager at Crossroads Care Hertfordshire North

Claire Austin hands a £5,000 cheque to Andrew Taylor, operations manager at Crossroads Care Hertfordshire North

 

 

Remembering those we have lost

November 10th, 2017    Author:
Silk flower display on Bier in Austins Stevenage

Silk flower display on Bier in Austins Stevenage

Every year on the second Sunday in November, people around the country remember those who lost their lives in the First World War. The annual Remembrance Sunday is a time to remind ourselves of the sacrifice they made for us and to honour their memory.

In London, a National Service of Remembrance takes place at The Cenotaph in Whitehall, which is attended by members of the Royal Family, representatives from the Government and Armed Forces as well as many war veterans. There are also services held throughout the country. As a mark of respect, people wear poppies and join in with a national two-minute silence at 11am.

While Remembrance Sunday is about honouring our war veterans, we should remember that reflecting on those who’ve gone before us can be done at any time. Spending a few quiet moments thinking about loved ones who are no longer with us can help us to feel reconnected with them.

During this reflective time you might want to be alone with your memories. Privately, you can let your emotions surface – it may be sadness that your loved one is gone, happiness at the joy they brought to your life, or most probably a mix of emotions. This is your time to acknowledge what they meant to you and allow yourself space to think about them.

Other people may prefer to join with family and friends to honour a loved one. You may wish to visit their resting place with flowers, or simply come together to share your thoughts and memories.

We all have busy lives, but there’s something wonderful about allowing ourselves time for reflection. It helps remind us that our loved ones may be gone but they are never forgotten.

Austins will be laying a wreath at the Stevenage Remembrance Service.

Photograph is of our funeral bier in our Stevenage office with a silk poppy floral display.

* For help and support planning a funeral or cremation, please contact us on 01438 316623.

Funerals in Ancient Rome

November 6th, 2017    Author:

From professional mourners to elaborate processions, we look at how wealthy Romans said goodbye to their deceased…

Back in the days of Ancient Rome, it was believed that a person’s soul left their body through the mouth – so the nearest relation would be at their loved one’s deathbed ready to inhale their last breath. Afterwards, the deceased would be lovingly bathed, perfumed and dressed in fine robes then coins would be placed over their eyes or under their tongue.

For the funeral procession, wealthy Romans would have an elaborate affair organised by professional undertakers called libitinarii. At the head of the procession there were dancers, musicians and actors wearing masks signifying the deceased’s ancestors. Also taking part were paid female mourners who wailed loudly while pulling their hair and scratching their faces. Following behind the main procession, friends and relatives transported the deceased in an open cloth-covered bier, or bed-like tray.

The deceased would either be buried or cremated and their ashes placed in an urn within a columbarium, or dovecote. This was an important part of the funeral ritual, as the Romans believed that until a body was interred it couldn’t cross the River Styx – the mythical river that took the deceased from Earth to the Underworld. Nine days later, there would be a feast, during which a libation was poured over the grave or ashes.

After a person’s death, families regularly commemorated their loved ones by gathering around their tomb and making offerings to the spirits. The Roman state also set aside special commemoration days during the year so that people could honour their ancestors.

While we may not follow the same traditions as the Ancient Romans, like them we do all we can to give our loved ones a memorable a send-off and to keep their memory alive in our hearts.

* For help and support planning a funeral or cremation, please contact us on 01438 316623

How Mexicans honour the departed

October 25th, 2017    Author:

Next month it’s Mexico’s Day of the Day so we’re taking a look at this annual tradition…

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The Day of the Dead, or Día de los Muertos, began in Mexico several thousand years ago at a time when the Aztecs believed mourning loved ones was disrespectful. They considered the deceased to still be part of the community and wanted a way to keep their memory and spirit alive. The annual event, which takes place on the first two days of November, is held throughout Mexico and is now listed by UNESCO as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

During the celebrations, altars are built in homes and cemeteries ready to welcome visiting spirits. Colourful marigolds decorate the altar, which is purified with smoke from copal incense and laden with offerings such as family photos and a candle for each dead relative. A toy may be left for a child spirit.

Food and drink are also left out ready for the deceased. Some families may offer ‘pan dulce’ – a typical Mexican sweetbread – that’s been decorated with bones and skulls made out of dough. Others may prepare their loved one’s favourite meal. Sugar skulls are also a popular offering.

Outside, the streets are decorated with ‘papel picado’, intricately designed shapes made from coloured tissue paper. And everyone gets into the party mood to celebrate the festivities. They paint their faces with skulls and put on fancy dress costumes to parade through their town, city or village.

Far removed from the sombre memorial ceremonies of some other cultures, the Mexicans remind us that remembering our loved ones can be a happy, uplifting and joyful occasion.

* For help and support planning a funeral or cremation, please contact us on 01438 316623.