Austin's Blog

 

How to write an obituary

April 24th, 2018    Author:

An obituary gives notice of a person’s death along with details of the funeral service and memorial information. You might want to write a short obituary for the local paper and a longer version to be read as a eulogy at the service. This can celebrate the deceased by including more about their personality, their achievements and significant life events. A detailed obituary makes a lovely lasting tribute that can be used on a memorial website or as a remembrance in a family scrapbook.

Here are a few tips that we hope will help you when writing an obituary…

Announcing the death

The obituary should start by detailing the name and age of the deceased along with their place of residence and the time and place of death. Use language that you feel comfortable with – some people prefer to say ‘died’ while others might want to write something like ‘passed away’. It’s also up to you whether you state the cause of death. In the case of sudden death, it may help you having to repeatedly explain the cause to people around you.

Listing the family
As part of the obituary, you need to list surviving family members as well as immediate family who preceded the deceased, starting with the closest relative first. Write the relative’s first name followed by the first name of their spouse in brackets and then the surname – for example: Helen (Rory) Jones. If the couple aren’t married, follow this format: Helen (Rory Brown) Jones. With a large family, it may not be possible to list everyone so here you can keep it to numbers, such as ‘ten grandchildren’.

Notifying mourners
An important part of the obituary is to let mourners know details of the funeral service and this should include the time, date and venue plus the officiant’s name. Similar details should be given for the burial or cremation.

Leaving a special message

It’s not compulsory but you may want to end the obituary by thanking a particular hospital, hospice or care home. You can also use the last part of the obituary to inform people about making a donation rather than leaving floral tributes, or sign off with a line from a poem or prayer.

Showing a photo
You don’t have to include a photo with the obituary, but it will help the notice to stand out and make it easier for friends and neighbours to spot in the newspaper. For this reason, it’s best to use an up-to-date photo of the deceased so that they are easily recognisable.

* If you have any questions about writing an obituary, please contact Austin’s on 01438 316623 or come in to any of our branches

5 A Day

May 24th, 2017    Author:

We were stunned when this amazing floral display arrived a few weeks ago.  It’s certainly different and we’ve never seen anything quite like it!  Becky from Aura Floral Design based in Stevenage was approached by the family who said they were looking for something a bit different.  Michael loved his fruit and veg and asked Becky to create a tribute which was fitting for him.  We think she did an amazing job.

 

Fruit and Veg Display

Let’s talk about the ‘D’ word

April 26th, 2017    Author:

Death and dying are not something most people naturally want to talk about. In fact, one research study found that people would rather discuss money or politics with family and friends. So it’s often not until a loved one dies that our thoughts turn to their wishes concerning their funeral.

Unfortunately, according to the study, only 30% of people had let someone know their funeral wishes. It also found that because of people’s reticence to talk about death, only 25% of respondents had asked a family member about their end of life wishes and just 7% had written down their wishes about the care they’d like if they were unable to make decisions.

With Dying Matters Week  taking place next month, it’s hoped that people will be encouraged to think about and discuss death and dying. During the week there will be nationwide events on this important subject, including coffee mornings, healing woodland walks, spiritual ceremonies, talks and film screenings.

It may be a good time to open up the conversation with loved ones and ask them questions such as how they would like to be looked after in later life, whether they’ve made a will and what kind of funeral they’d like. Perhaps they have a particular song they’d like or they have a favourite colour they’d like incorporated into the ceremony.

Talking about death doesn’t have to be morbid or depressing. Chatting about it is a great opportunity to think about what you’d like and to let friends and family know your wishes. When the time comes, it will help them to know that they are doing the right thing and that everything is as you wanted it.

* For help and support planning a funeral, please contact us on 01438 815555.

Personalising a Funeral

April 9th, 2017    Author:

Over the years, funeral services have begun to change and personalisation has become increasingly popular. These days when you attend a funeral you may see a display of personal items or mementos that were connected to the deceased or perhaps a collage of photographs.

Many people choose to include personal touches like this in the funeral service to help celebrate their loved one’s life instead of focusing on mourning their passing. By reflecting the deceased’s personality, hobbies, interests or passions, it illustrates how unique and special that person was. And it offers a strong emotional connection for those who have come to pay their respects, helping them to remember the deceased as they say goodbye.

One wonderful example of personalisation was at the comedian Ronnie Corbett’s funeral when four candles were lit in homage to one of the Two Ronnie’s most famous sketches. In the sketch, Corbett played a hardware shopkeeper who misunderstands when a customer, played by Ronnie Barker, asks for ‘fork handles’. The comedian’s iconic glasses were also placed on the coffin.

If you’re planning a funeral and would like a personalised tribute think about how your loved one could be remembered. What was their passion or hobby? Did they have a special nickname, a favourite joke, a place they regularly visited? What did they do that made you laugh?

You might want to sit down with family members or friends to recall your fondest memories of the deceased and discuss how you can incorporate them into the funeral service. Joining together to reminisce can also be a useful way to begin the healing process.

* We are here to help with every aspect of funeral planning. Just call us on 01438 316623.